Teesdale -Wild flowers

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Teesdale is famous for its botanical interest. Although concentrating on Geology I noticed many interesting plants and managed to take a few snaps such as this Northern marsh orchid (Dactylorhiza purpurella) above. the orchid below looks like the scented orchid (Gymnadenia conopsea).

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In the wet meadows Heath spotted orchid (datylorhiza maculata) was abundant and coming into flower, frillier than the Common spotted.

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Mountain pansies (Viola lutea) are a feature here. These are the purple form, liked by the green veined white butterfly as a source of nectar in the picture below.

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Mountain pansy comes in various colour forms such as this yellow variation.

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Unknown to me:  this flower is Alpine bistort (Polygonum viviparum), another of the specialities.

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Also unknown to me, this horsetail looked different, Shade horsetail (Equisetum pratense) seemed abundant.

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Another Horsetail for comparison, with branched fronds, the wood horsetail (Equisetum sylvaticum) below.

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There are Varigated horsetails here too. I missed them, but not the Globeflower (Trollius europaeus) in a drift with Creeping willow, Pignut, Water avens and more Shade horsetail.

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Wood cranesbill (Geranium sylvaticum) was widespread here growing with Great burnet.

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Bitter vetch (Lathyrus linifolium) growing on the Whin sill rocks at Low Force.

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In a pool on the same rocks, a sedge that looks like Star sedge (Carex echinata), another sedge,

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probably common sedge (Carex nigra) or Pale sedge pictured below

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On a Whin outcrop a Hawkweed of some sort, Northern Hawkweed (Hieracium vagum)?

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Pictured below another speciality, Common Butterwort (Pinguicula vulgaris) growing in a wet flush not far from the struggling Juniper forest. Common Butterwort is an insectivorous plant. Its bright yellow-green leaves excrete a sticky fluid that attracts unsuspecting insects; once trapped, the leaves slowly curl around their prey and digest it.

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The fern growing at the top of high force is Lemon scented fern (Oreopteris limbosperma). I was puzzled by these Male fern lookalikes but their pale lime green colour and faint scent led me to think Lemon scented.

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Some other plants noted: Good king Henry Chenopodium bonus-henricus), Stone bramble, Rock whitebeam (Sorbus rupicola),  Globe thistle (Cirsium heterophyllum) almost in flower, Lesser pond sedge, Glaucus sedge, Bog asphodel, Smooth ladies mantle.

 

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